Hireology Blog - Insights for better hiring & HR


You're Not Lying to Candidates, Are You?

Posted by Erin Borgerson on March 24, 2014

Nothing ever good comes out of lying to job candidates, but what if you are lying without being aware of it? Sorry, that’s still just as bad. During the hiring process fingers are always pointed at candidates for lying or exaggerating their accomplishments, think again. Did you ever think that your company could be lying to the candidate as well? Be careful because you might be without even knowing it!

How Honest Is Your Job Description?

One of the main purposes of a job description is to entice job seekers to apply to the position. You want to make your company seem like the coolest place on earth to work at. Be conscious that you aren’t over selling some of the high lights the company has to offer.22444518_s In addition to sprucing up the job, many times companies might take a job description previously used for another job and change it up a bit. Don’t take the easy way out! A job description for another job that’s tweaked a little can still include things that are irrelevant. 

Answer Interview Questions Honestly

Okay, so you are interviewing a candidate that you absolutely love and want to hire. Now lets say for example the candidate asks you a question such as whether or not your company plans on adding specific software to their system that they’ve successfully used at their previous job. Because you’re really interested in the candidate you respond by telling them that the company can look into adding the software in the future, even though you know this won't happen. Giving responses like this gives the candidate false information. Sure you aren’t completely lying because it could be a possibility to add the software, but unless you know for sure don’t make any promises. The odds are once the candidate is hired they will be asking for an update on whether or not the company is adding the new software and how awkward is that?

Don't Give False Hope

This is mostly important when hiring interns, but it can also be applied to job candidates too. Of course it’s essential to give an insight on what type of tasks the job entails, but before stating exact tasks make sure you are 100% sure that the candidate will have a chance to do them. Job candidates, as well as interns, want to have responsibilities that they are already knowledgeable in or they are looking for a learning opportunity. Giving false hope is, you guessed it, is lying! 

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Erin Borgerson

About the Author

Erin is the Director of Marketing, Crisis Controller and Culture Ambassador (the last two titles she gave to herself) who joined the Hireology team in April of 2012. As a certified Inbound Marketer, Erin manages Hireology's marketing department, the Hireology Blog, and media relations. She is also a co-leader of the Chicago Hubspot User Group which brings together Hubspot users from around the Chicagoland area. Erin set off to Chicago after graduating from Western Michigan University. In her spare time she can be found shaking it in a Zumba class, reading a bestseller, or drinking a craft beer on her Wrigleyville porch.