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Managing Millennials: 6 Things To Steer Clear Of

Posted by James Patrick Kahler on April 2, 2015

“Should’ve, could’ve, would've” is a quote a manager never wants to use when describing his or her former business. While a failed business is sometimes the result of unforeseen factors, such as a poor economy or insufficient capital, there are certain aspects that can be measured to perfection. 

One thing that can be completely controlled by any supervisor is how you manage your younger employees—the millennials. As this younger segment of the workforce continues to grow, it’s necessary to understand how they think, work and behave; otherwise, you’ll miss out on a fine opportunity to develop the future of your business.


Avoid These Six Mistakes

1.) Limiting Communication

Cutting off channels of communication with your younger employees is a great way to diminish their trust and relationship with you. Try to uphold some form of transparency. This will help your millennials feel more comfortable and open with you, as well as let them know that you value their opinions. Open communication usually builds trust in management; so if you’re not already doing this, give it a try!

2.) Maintaining a Traditional Office

Get with the times! Office culture is crucial to motivating millennials. If your workplace environment is fun, laid-back and operates under a flexible schedule, you’re more likely to get better work from your employees. Managing an office where your team actually enjoy coming to work everyday is a valuable thing for your business.

3.) Avoiding Mentorship 6_millennial_candidates_mini

If you truly want your Gen Y employees to thrive in your office, you’ll help guide them in the right direction. This generation actually prefers some form of guidance during the early stages of their career too, so help them out! It’ll help build motivation and develop the specific skill-set they might be trying to improve.

4.) Demanding Extra Hours

You shouldn’t have to make working past the normal work hours mandatory for your employees; it should be voluntary and come natural. If you’re leading a successful team of Gen Y employees, they’ll take the initiative to work extra hours because they actually care about your business.

5.) Advocating Office Division

Don’t separate yourself from your employees. The same goes for everyone else in the office. Studies have shown that there are benefits to an open layout in your office. It builds teamwork and communication. You want your company to succeed as a team, not as a bunch of individuals.

6.) Ignoring Accomplishments

This is just ignorant! Everyone deserves some form of recognition when they succeed. Regardless of what you consider an accomplishment for your young employees, highlighting your employees and their achievements strengthens motivation for the other employees in the office. If you don’t have an incentive program for your millennials when they hit their goals, give a shot. Incentives boost motivation for everyone and can be an awarding addition to your office culture if done right.

Get the most out of your Gen Y employees. They have plenty to offer to your business, so try your best to make sure they’re working under the management and office environment. Do this and someday you’ll be able to look back at your time managing these millennials with a sense of pride, rather than “should’ve, could've, would’ve.”

Don’t lie to yourself. Are you truly connecting with your Gen Y employees? Learn how to get the most from your young workers by downloading the complimentary eBook below.

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Talent Management, Hiring Millennials, Company Culture, Management, Start Ups

James Patrick Kahler

About the Author

James Patrick Kahler is Hireology’s Copywriter & Content Specialist. He is a graduate of the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University and has over four years of professional experience writing for various industries. Outside of the office (and sometimes inside), he has a passion for comedy, advertising and his Cleveland sports teams…all of them.