Hireology Blog - Insights for better hiring & HR


5 Common Misconceptions About Hiring

Posted by Erin Borgerson on February 20, 2014

Everyone has an opinion about hiring. Your colleague, your boss, your mom, your pet fish - everyone. "Oh, you should try this" or "No, no, don't do that. My way is much better." The fact of the matter is, there's not one right way to go about hiring. However, there are certainly less effective ways that can be detrimental to your hiring process. 

Let's take a look at five of the most common hiring misconceptions, and how you can learn from them...

"I know exactly what kind of candidate to hire - a candidate like my most successful employee."

22880622_sReferred to as bench-marking, the practice of measuring candidates against your most successful employees is a relatively common practice amongst hiring managers. While it can be a beneficial tool when done correctly, many companies don't have enough data from a large enough pool of employees to correctly use bench-marking in the hiring process.

Instead of going into hiring with an image of the "perfect" candidate, keep your mind open. You very well may come across someone completely different than any of your other employees that could be a great fit for the position. 

"Filling the position won't take that long."

Whether you're hiring a residential cleaning professional or a CEO, your hiring process is going to require an investment of time. And chances are, it's going to take longer than you were expecting. You have to take the time to write a job description, post the job to job boards, screen candidates, schedule interviews, conduct interviews, conduct more interviews, and then wait for a candidate to sign the offer letter. Sure, it looks like something you complete in two weeks or so, but for many people, those weeks turn into months before the position is successfully filled. 

So rather than put it off until the last minute, start hiring now. Chances are that it is going to take longer than you think.

"I don't need to invest in an 'extraneous' hiring tools."

Hiring costs money. It's as simple as that. But many managers feel that as long as they post the job to their company's career page, people will apply. While that is true, limiting yourself to candidates applying through just one medium can not only lengthen your hiring process, but result in you hiring a candidate you aren't thrilled about. 

Now this isn't to say that you have to dish out thousands of dollars just to attract candidates, but you do have to spend some money. Do your research and find out which job boards are best for sourcing candidates for your industry. In doing so you'll end up saving time and money in the long run.

"I'll just keep interviewing a candidate until I know whether I want to hire them."

No you won't. You don't have the time for that, nor do your candidates. Not only do they not have the time to keep coming into your office for interviews, but chances are they'll find another job before you finally make up your mind.

There are plenty of other ways to help you determine whether you want to hire a certain candidate, and endless interviews are not part of that equation. Instead, try ask more effective questions during the interviews you do conduct, administer background checks and skills assessments, and have the candidate shadow an employee in a similar position. 

"Testing candidates is too risky."

If you do your research before administering any kind of pre-employment assessment, you'll see that you really have nothing to worry about in terms of litigation. Sure, if you base a hiring decision off the results of someone's personality assessment because they don't align with your idea of the perfect employee, then you are opening yourself up for suit. However, it absolutely encouraged to conduct pre-employment assessments either before offering the job or putting a clause in the offer letter. 

Of course it's understandable that hiring managers want to avoid lawsuits at any cost, so to help put your mind at ease and ensure you are upholding workplace compliance laws, join our webinar on March 6th. Register below.

workplace compliance

How to Hire

Erin Borgerson

About the Author

Erin is the Director of Marketing, Crisis Controller and Culture Ambassador (the last two titles she gave to herself) who joined the Hireology team in April of 2012. As a certified Inbound Marketer, Erin manages Hireology's marketing department, the Hireology Blog, and media relations. She is also a co-leader of the Chicago Hubspot User Group which brings together Hubspot users from around the Chicagoland area. Erin set off to Chicago after graduating from Western Michigan University. In her spare time she can be found shaking it in a Zumba class, reading a bestseller, or drinking a craft beer on her Wrigleyville porch.